Is strength training important for a 5K

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Caters
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Is strength training important for a 5K

Postby Caters » Sat Oct 28, 2017 9:09 am

I know that strength training is as important for a marathon as running but is strength training important for running a 5K? I have seen a lot of plans out there and some just involve running, walking, and rest days, whereas others involve 30-40 minutes of strength training in between runs(and this is just when looking at 5K plans). I am having difficulty choosing a 5K training plan but I know that I want to run a 5K and not just walk a 5K. If my momma goes into the race as well when I am trained, she can just walk the 5K if she wants to or maybe alternate between running and walking, but I doubt that she is going to push herself to run a 5K with 0 training. This 5K training is why my momma got me a treadmill. I was thinking that if I use the treadmill, I could regularly turn around on a positive incline to train for hills up to the maximum incline of the treadmill(which I think is 30 degrees)(when I face away from the buttons, I would basically be simulating running downhill and when I am facing towards the buttons, I would be simulating running uphill).

So I could start by doing interval training in place until I can run for 30 minutes. Then I can use the treadmill to train for hills. Then I will be trained for distance and incline. But do I have to do strength training or could I get by with just running?

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Re: Is strength training important for a 5K

Postby Boss Man » Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:10 pm

I personally would heed caution about using a treadmill the other way round to simulate running down declined gradients, as you run the risk of elevated injury concern, because if you were to potentially have an accident, you can't hold onto a safety bar and you would be facing away from the console, where it would be less easy to use the emergency shutoff, if you felt you were literally seconds away from losing your balance through fatigue, or not being able to sustain a certain pace or running cadence, for as long as you thought you might be able to.

As for weight training it is not vital for running disciplines, but it could still benefit you in the long-term when you were old, because having the added strength might mean the difference between being 80 and independent, or 80 and being in care, so look at it as something potentially beneficial for the long term and not for just doing 5k races.

As long as technique is implemented correctly all the time and the weight is not overloaded then you should be fine.

Just avoid things that promote risk, like side planks where you rest on the palm of your hand not the forearm and things like wrist curls and exercises that could harm the rotator cuff, like behind the neck press for example where you lower and raise cables or barbells behind your neck.

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Re: Is strength training important for a 5K

Postby Caters » Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:27 pm

But the negative incline setting for most treadmills only goes to 3-5 degrees down compared to the positive incline of up to 30 degrees. Most hills have the same or similar magnitude of slope when comparing uphill to downhill so if I were to use the treadmill at a positive incline of 30 degrees(this would of course be after some time acclimating to increased incline) to train for hills with a grade of up to 30 degrees, wouldn't it be better to also train for going downhill at 30 degrees? And if I were to find a track with lots of hills, how would I know the grade of those hills? I don't think there are any treadmills that have a negative incline setting that can be at the same magnitude as the positive incline setting. So turning around to face away from the buttons on a positive incline of 30 degrees is the closest that I could get to a negative incline of 30 degrees without having to search for tracks of which the grade of the hills is known to be 30 degrees.

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Re: Is strength training important for a 5K

Postby Boss Man » Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:37 pm

I can accept what you're saying certainly, my only concern is not that it wouldn't be an effective way to train, more so that without the ability to hold on to a safety bar underneath the monitor or to be able to hit the emergency stop button as easily, you would be increasing risk of an accident a bit, especially if you fatigued more quickly then you thought.

If you fatigued more quickly then you thought on an actual road with a downward slope you could try and force your muscles to stop or slow down, but on a treadmill you couldn't just stop or slowdown without access to the emergency stop or the speed buttons, which would be facing away from you, so if you suddenly felt like you wee becoming too leggy and at risk of falling off, it would be hard to turn around and reach for the relevant controls needed to adjust the machine.

I maybe should have clarified initially my stance on the effectiveness of running down a treadmill incline, rather than just highlighting the possible increased safety risk, so that was a minor oversight on my part.

I don't think what you're proposing is a bad way to do cardio in relation to effectiveness, just that it might promote a slight increased risk of an accident and one or more possible injuries, relating to fatigue and / or a mistake in running technique or style.


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